Filmmaker Question & Answer

by Phillip Wilcox "Our Movie Demon"

Zack Parker

 

Dark Comedy Productions

 

In your own words, to you, what is Proxy about?

 

Zack Parker

 

It is about two women - complete opposites in personality, social class, and appearance - but who share slightly different versions of the same mental condition/addiction. This condition is what connects them, and begins to fill a void in each of their lives.

 

DCP

 

Does the title of this film, in fact, tie in to what the story is about?

 

ZP

 

Absolutely.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DCP

 

What was the most challenging part for you in both making the film and writing the script?

 

ZP

 

I'm always trying to tackle a subject I haven't seen fully explored in cinema before, then executing that idea in a way that is unique and unexpected for the audience. Achieving this is always difficult.

 

DCP

 

What was the most challenging part for your actors?

 

ZP

 

The subject matter in PROXY tends to be quite dark, so I think tapping into those uncomfortable places and motivations can be difficult for actors. Luckily I was surrounded by incredibly talented individuals, and they were more than up for the task. I couldn't be more pleased with the performances in the film.

 

DCP

 

What the easiest or happiest moment in making the film/writing the script?

 

ZP

 

For me, the most exciting part of the writing process is when you surprise yourself. It's rare, but exhilarating when it happens. Nothing is easy about making a film, but my favorite part of the process has become editing. It's the point when you've finally accumulated all of the pieces required to make a film, now you just have to figure out how they all fit together.

 

DCP

 

The first 4 minutes of the film shocked me the first time I saw the film, was that scene always intended to be in the beginning of the picture?

 

ZP

 

Yes. I tend to be what some call a "slow-burn" filmmaker. I knew I wanted to hit the audience hard at the beginning of this film - throw them off balance, make them feel as if anything can happen at any time. This would then create an innate sense of suspense and tension, allowing me the time to appropriately build the story and characters.

 

DCP

 

How did casting Kristina Klebe come about?

 

ZP

 

I met Kristina through Hanna Hall. They knew each other from Zombie's HALLOWEEN, and Hanna had been in my previous film SCALENE. I noticed an immediate intensity to Kristina. Kevin Donner and I had just begun writing PROXY, so I kept her in the back of my mind moving forward with the character of Anika.

 

DCP

 

What was her reaction to the script and her part?

 

ZP

 

She was very enthusiastic about it. I think she was excited about exploring a type of character that she really hadn't played before. Fortunately she really enjoyed SCALENE as well. A previous film can really make or break you landing an actor.

 

DCP

 

How did casting Joe Swanberg come about?

 

 

ZP

 

I met Joe through a fellow filmmaker friend, whom he'd done a few films with. I had really enjoyed several of the film's Joe had directed, and my friend had nothing but good things to say about working with him. I sent him the script for PROXY, along with a copy of SCALENE. Again, fortunately he really dug both and was in right away. I'll admit there was some trepidation or concern on my part about having another filmmaker on set, but it never became an issue. Joe and I have very different styles of working and technique. He knew his job as an actor was to facilitate what I needed as the director. It was pretty refreshing, actually.

 

DCP

 

What is the most memorable experience in making the film?

 

ZP

 

Shooting the bathroom scene in the middle of the film was probably the most fun and most difficult time I've ever experienced making a movie. We used a super slow-motion camera called the Phantom, which required its own technician. We had built the bathroom set, but only had one day to shoot. Shooting slow motion requires about four times as much light as usual. It was the middle of the summer and incredibly hot. Not only did we have the slow-mo shots, but several dialogue scenes to shoot on the Alexa on that set as well. It was a very long day, and since we didn't have time to clean up between takes, (the blood/gore) we had to shoot the shotgun sequence in order. This also meant I only got one take of each of those shots. It was quite stressful, but I'm pretty happy with the final result.

To keep up to date with Zack Parker check out his Facebook

 

To learn more about Proxy, read Our Movie Demon's review

 

Don't forget to check out Proxy and Inversion on Facebook!

For inquiries or scoops please contact us.

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