Filmmaker Q&A Barry Fahy

by Phillip Wilcox "Our Movie Demon"

Comment

Courtesy of Mike Shawcross

Courtesy of Mike Shawcross

 

DCP:

Let's start from the beginning - When/How did your love for cinema begin?

 

Barry Fahy:

To be honest, I don’t remember a time when I didn’t love movies. When I was really young I remember my parents bringing me to the cinema and I always remember being excited, it was always a new adventure and something that always had my full attention. As I got older, my father introduced me to Monty Python, the Airplane! Movies and Naked Gun films. He also introduced me to the likes of Blazing Saddles and I guess that’s where my sense of humor came from. But what truly kicked off my love of cinema was Jurassic Park. That was the first film that had me asking myself “How did they make real dinosaurs?” From that point onward, I always watched any special features I could find and wanted to know as much as I could about how movies were made.

 

DCP:

What are some films (of any genre) that have impacted and/or influenced you the most, as a fan of cinema, and as an artist as well?

 

 

BF:

As mentioned in the last question, I love the old school comedies where the writing and delivery of lines were based on tropes of the English language. That was so clever to me. Films with heart made me feel emotion, even at a young age, and have really stuck with me. Homeward Bound was one of those films. More recently movies that have made the most impact on me were films with a great twist and amazing characters. Films like Fight Club, The Sixth Sense, Se7en and The Green Mile. Other Top Movies from a multitude of genres like The Matrix, Inception, Team America, American History X and The Saw Franchise.

 

DCP:

Who or What inspires you?

 

BF:People, People are my biggest inspiration. My Girlfriend, for example, has run her own business since she was 19. Seeing her dedication, and what she’s worked through to be where she is really inspires me to work harder and really go for what you want in life. Also people who have a drive and go for it. Like everyone I’ve met through Celtic Badger Media and the stuff we have worked on together. Paddy, Aaron, Brian, Tubz and all of these amazing people who will always go out of their way and make time to make a film we all believe in. That inspires me to do better.

 

 

DCP:

Cinema has some of the best pair-ups of all time: Spielberg and Williams, Scoresese and Schoonmaker. You have shot 10 films for and collaborated creatively with the great Paddy Murphy, can you tell us about how that journey began, and what keeps you coming back to collaborate with him and shoot the films he directs?

 

BF:Ha ha. Thanks so much for that complement! That’s a quote for the next showreel! Our Journey started with a small short film with a big idea, that film was “The Three Don’ts”. “The Three Don’ts” is now a feature film and I believe has the potential to do some great things. The film was organized almost entirely over Facebook messanger, as I live almost an hours drive away from Paddy and the lads. In fact, the first time I physically met Paddy was on Set on the very first night of shooting! I was brought onto the project by Brian Clancy, who I’d known through skateboarding and music for years, and when he sent me the script, there was no way I wasn’t going to be involved. The Characters and humor was spot on to the types of films that I’ve loved for years. It was a character driven piece with heart and humor, I would have been a fool to turn down that opportunity! And here we are almost 18 moths later, having worked on almost every film together since.

 

 

Paddy and I have an almost telepathic link. When I read through his scripts, his characters are so well written and verbalized, the imagery jumps off the page like a novel. I picture the shots and lighting in my head and when it comes to shooting, we have always been entirely on the same page. We are always bouncing ideas, making suggestions, trying new things and condensing shots!

 

I guess the TL:DR version is that Paddy is a funny, clever individual, who writes amazing stories that I always look forward to putting my camera in front of!

 

DCP:

What is your personal philosophy on cinematography and what it means to you when it comes to filmmaking?

 

BF:

My main philosophy on cinematography is that it is purpose is to help tell and enhance the story. Great visuals mean nothing without substance and story. Everything is considered in every shot, lighting and colour, what emotion you want the audience to experience, framing, what you want to say about the character and what they are going through, and camera movement, what you want to hide, show or reveal to the audience. Everything should have a reason.

 

DCP:

What has been the most challenging film you've shot to date, and why?

 

BF:

“Retribution” was quite a tough one, but it was mainly due to time restrictions with shooting at night and how long we had at certain locations. The routine was setup, shoot, pack up all the gear into my little Renault, drive to the next location and setup again. It was still an amazing shoot, and I loved every minute, but that was just the most pressured we were with the number of locations that were quite a drive apart and only one weekend to get it done. But Adam Moylan, Nicholas Vince and all of the actors really killed it and their stellar performances made the time restrictions not seem as difficult!

 

 

 

DCP:

You yourself have directed a short film - How does it compare to being a cinematographer, and are there any lessons that you've learned either as director Or cinematographer that you carry with you on each film?

 

BF:

I think there is a lot more pressure on a Director, everyone wants to help the director make the film he/she wants to make and that usually involves a lot of questions being asked and answered. Directing “Please Forgive Me” was a different experience for me and my first time dealing with that side of things. Everything from Co-writing with Eleanor Walsh, Casting Actors like Lisa Tyrrell and assembling a kickass team. Before that short I had Directed some music videos, but they were always based on the visual aspect of telling a story, and although “Please Forgive Me” is a very visual piece too, It was interesting to me to direct actors and flesh out stories and ideas that I have had for a while.

 

I am interested in Directing more films, and have some ideas that I cannot wait to flesh out, build and create with the glorious team of Badgers we have assembled!

 

DCP:

Can you talk to us about any upcoming projects you may be working on for the future?

 

 

As always with these things, there is a lot going on behind the scenes that is too early days to talk about, but right now we are in Post production on The Sad Ones and An Beanshi which are shorts produced by yourselves at DCP and in September we are doing some reshoots for The Three Don’ts feature film. We also Recently launched our official Youtube channel which will have new content coming out every week, with 1 new short every month. This month we are featuring “I.R.I.S.” a short Paddy, the Badgers and I created for the 48hr film competition in 2015, followed next month by our much anticipated dark comedy “Cuppa” on September 7th. We will also have behind the scenes, bloopers and we will be trying out new web series and comedy sketches. So that will be one to watch out for!

Courtesy of Mike Shawcross

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