Frank Mosley Q & A

by Phillip Wilcox "Our Movie Demon"

Comment

 

DCP:
First of all I want to thank you for your time and agreeing to this interview! I always love to start from the beginning - How old were you when you became interested in movies, and what was it that sparked your love for cinema?


Frank Mosley:
I became interested in movies because of my father.  He loved cinema of all kinds and started showing me at a very early age everything from silent films to martial arts films.  He made me appreciate that movies were an actual art, not just something to pass the time with on tv at home.  He had borrowed a home video camera from a friend and for fun one day decided to make WIZARD OF OZ starring me in all the roles.  That was the start.  By the time I was 7 years old, I was then directing my own movies with friends with that very same camera.

 

DCP:
You're an actor as well as a filmmaker - Which did you want to pursue first and why?


FM:
I don't think I pursued one over the other.  To me, they each feed the other.  When you're a kid, you're make believing anyway and just want to capture that.  So I started making movies so that I could bottle the little plays/stories I would perform for my friends.  But even as an adult now, each of them makes me only stronger in the other craft.  I don't lean toward one or the other more, either.  I certainly don't care much for acting in my OWN work.  I like directing other people; giving talented friends the opportunity to perform.  And I like acting for other people in their work.  But I know I love both equally because when I direct too often, I can miss acting. And vice versa.

 

DCP:
What are some things you find fun and/or challenging about directing, producing, and acting?


FM:
I mean, it's all fun.  I think even at its most difficult, you wouldn't be doing any of it unless you thought it was fun in some way.  Because you care about it.  Even though certain phases of production are harder than others or preferred for me, it's all worth it when you see your film projected on a huge screen in its finished form.  As for difficulties, each film has its own challenges, right?  Based on content and form.... But for me, a big thing is always financing.  Always.  At the indie stage, it's the same song and dance for everyone.  And then trying to get your film OUT there is always another challenge.  For me, those are the two challenges that are most difficult.  Because they can be so much out of your control. 

 

 

DCP:
What are some lessons you have learned along the way in filmmaking and acting that you are able to use towards one or the other?


FM:
Things you learn from filmmaking, though, include ways to communicate better with people.  With directing actors especially.  Everyone has their own language, their own method, their own history, all things to consider.  The other thing is to be open that your film is going to change.  Don't be afraid to let it become a different beast.  You have to have an intent and clear vision for your film and yet be entirely open to things change in this ever shifting, mercurial business that we're in.  But you also know how to know when not to compromise.  When you know you would lose the heart of your story if you were to say yeh/neh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DCP:
What films and/or actors/actresses inspire you on a daily basis? 


FM:
Oh, man.  You know, you have different inspirations for different parts of your life.  Anntonnioni, Tarkovsky, Scorsese, Cassavetes, have all done huge things for me growing up.  And actors like Meryl Streep, Dustin Hoffman, Philip Seymour Hoffman... There are numerous influences.  But recently, I have been drawing more from literature and music and other art.  And there are plenty of indie actors and directors out there that inspire me on a daily basis....The passion and dedication is always helpful to see in others when you might be going through a tough time.

 

DCP:
What is one thing about yourself that most people would be surprised to know about you?


FM:
I don't know about that.  I have told people a lot of things about me over the years...I'm sure some things have surfaced here or there about the same things.  Let's keep a lid on it, so that you can be surprised later!

 

DCP:
Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming films that you will be working on in front or behind the camera?


FM:
I am fortunate to have a few films on the festival circuit right now made by some incredibly talented friends that I acted in:  Cameron Bruce Nelson's SOME BEASTS, Calvin Reeder's THE BULB and THE PROCEDURE, and in Daniel Patrick Carbone's segment of the omnibus film COLLECTIVE UNCONSCIOUS.  If you get a chance to check any of these out, please do!  They're all so unique and thought provoking in their own ways.

As a director, I'm currently submitting my new short film SPIDER VEINS out to festivals.  It's about everyday artifice and the lies we can sometimes wrap ourselves around.  And I am in post on two other short films, one shot in Cuba and one shot in NYC.  Also busy writing what I hope is my next feature.  But we'll see.

 

To learn more about Frank and see his films check out http://www.frankmosley.com/

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